Document
Table of Contents

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-Q
ý
Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017
OR
o
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period                      to                     
Commission file number 001-10962  
 
 
 
Callaway Golf Company
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
 
Delaware
 
95-3797580
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
2180 Rutherford Road, Carlsbad, CA 92008
(760) 931-1771
(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of principal executive offices)
 
  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ý    No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ý    No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
 
ý
 
Accelerated filer
 
o
Non-accelerated filer
 
o  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company
 
o
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
 
o
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act). o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  o    No  ý
As of June 30, 2017, the number of shares outstanding of the Registrant’s common stock outstanding was 94,371,822.
 


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Important Notice to Investors Regarding Forward-Looking Statements: This report contains "forward-looking statements" as defined under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as: "may," "should," "will," "could," "would," "anticipate," "plan," "believe," "project," "estimate," "expect," "strategy," "future," "likely," "on track," and similar references to future periods. Forward-looking statements include, among others, statements that relate to future plans, events, liquidity, financial results or performance including, but not limited to, statements relating to future stock repurchases, cash flows and liquidity, compliance with debt covenants, estimated unrecognized stock compensation expense, projected capital expenditures and depreciation and amortization expense, market conditions, future contractual obligations, the realization of deferred tax assets, including loss and credit carryforwards, future income tax expense, the future impact of new accounting standards, the expected timing and completion of, and the integration of, the recently announced acquisition of TravisMathew, LLC (“TravisMathew”), the integration of the OGIO International, Inc ("OGIO") acquisition, the related financial impact of the future business and prospects of the Company, TravisMathew and OGIO, and the expected continued financial impact of the Company's joint venture in Japan. These statements are based upon current information and the Company's current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of the Company's business, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward-looking statements relate to the future, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and many of which are outside of the Company's control. As a result of these uncertainties and because the information on which these forward-looking statements is based may ultimately prove to be incorrect, actual results may differ materially from those anticipated. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ include, among others, the following:

certain risks and uncertainties, including changes in capital market or economic conditions;
delays or difficulties in the completion of, or the integration of, the TravisMathew acquisition;
delays or difficulties in the integration of the OGIO acquisition;
consumer acceptance of and demand for the Company’s products;
future retailer purchasing activity, which can be significantly affected by adverse industry conditions and overall retail inventory levels;
any unfavorable changes in U.S. trade, tax or other policies, including restrictions on imports or an increase in import tariffs;
the level of promotional activity in the marketplace;
future consumer discretionary purchasing activity, which can be significantly adversely affected by unfavorable economic or market conditions;
significant fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;
the ability of the Company to manage international business risks;
future changes in foreign currency exchange rates and the degree of effectiveness of the Company’s hedging programs;
adverse changes in the credit markets or continued compliance with the terms of the Company’s credit facilities;
delays, difficulties or increased costs in the supply of components needed to manufacture the Company’s products or in manufacturing the Company’s products, including the Company's dependence on a limited number of suppliers for some of its products;
adverse weather conditions and seasonality;
any rule changes or other actions taken by the USGA or other golf association that could have an adverse impact upon demand or supply of the Company’s products;
the ability of the Company to protect its intellectual property rights;
a decrease in participation levels in golf;
the effect of terrorist activity, armed conflict, natural disasters or pandemic diseases on the economy generally, on the level of demand for the Company’s products or on the Company’s ability to manage its supply and delivery logistics in such an environment; and
the general risks and uncertainties applicable to the Company and its business.
Investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which are based on current information and speak only as of the date hereof. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect new information or events or circumstances after the date hereof or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. Investors should also be aware that while the Company from time to time does communicate with securities analysts, it is against the Company’s policy to disclose to them any material non-public information or other confidential commercial information. Furthermore, the Company has a policy against distributing or confirming financial forecasts or projections issued by analysts and any reports issued by such analysts are not the responsibility of the Company. Investors should not assume that the Company agrees with any report


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issued by any analyst or with any statements, projections, forecasts or opinions contained in any such report. For details regarding these and other risks and uncertainties, see Part I, Item IA, "Risk Factors" contained in the Company's most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as the Company's quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K subsequently filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time.

Callaway Golf Company Trademarks: The following marks and phrases, among others, are trademarks of Callaway Golf Company: Apex-Apex Tour-APW-Aqua Dry-Arm Lock-Backstryke-Big Bertha-Big Bertha Alpha-Big T-Black Series-Callaway-Callaway Golf- Callaway Media Productions-Callaway Supersoft-C Grind-Chev-Chev 18-Chevron Device-Chrome Soft-Comfort Tech-CXR-Cup 360-360 Face Cup-D.A.R.T.-Dawn Patrol-Divine-Eagle-Engage-Epic-ERC-Exo-Cage-FTiZ-FT Optiforce-Fast Tech Mantle-FT Performance-FT Tour-Fusion-Fusion RX-GBB-Gems-Gravity Core-Great Big Bertha-Great Big Bertha Epic-Heavenwood-Hex Aerodynamics-Hex Chrome-Hex Solaire-HX-Hyper Dry-Hyper Lite-Hyper Speed Face-IMIX-Innovate or Die design-Ion X-Jailbird-Jailbreak-Kings of Distance-Legacy-Longer From Everywhere-Mack Daddy-MarXman-MD3 Milled-Microhinge Face Insert-MetalX-Number One Putter in Golf-Odyssey-Odyssey Works-O Works-OptiFit-Opti Flex-Opti Grip-Opti Shield-Opti Therm-ORG 14-ORG 15-Ogio-ProType-∙R∙-Rossie-R Moto-RSX-S2H2-Sabertooth-SoftFast-Solaire-Speed Regime-Speed Step-SR1-SR2-SR3-Steelhead-Steehlead XR-Strata-Strata Jet-Stronomic-Sub Zero-Superhot-Tank-Tank Cruiser-Teron-Tech Series-TiHot-Toe Up-Toulon-Tour Authentic -Trade In! Trade Up!-Trionomer Cover-Tru Bore-udesign-Uptown-Versa-Warbird-Weather Series-Wedgeducation-W Grind-White Hot-White Hot Tour-White Hot Pro-White Hot Pro Havok-White Ice-World's Friendliest-X-12-X-14-X-16-X-18-X-20- X-22-X-24-X Act-X Hot-X Hot Pro-X² Hot-XR 16-XR design-X Series-XSPANN-Xtra Traction Technology-XTT-Xtra Width Technology-2-Ball-3 Deep.









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CALLAWAY GOLF COMPANY
INDEX

 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
Item 5.
Item 6.


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PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1.    Financial Statements (Unaudited)
CALLAWAY GOLF COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
(In thousands, except share data)
 
June 30,
2017
 
December 31,
2016
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
61,959

 
$
125,975

Accounts receivable, net
224,649

 
127,863

Inventories
171,780

 
189,400

Income taxes receivable
2,849

 
637

Other current assets
20,796

 
16,550

Total current assets
482,033

 
460,425

Property, plant and equipment, net
60,654

 
54,475

Intangible assets, net
139,960

 
88,731

Goodwill
31,908

 
25,593

Deferred taxes, net
82,835

 
114,707

Investment in golf-related venture (Note 8)
48,997

 
48,997

Other assets
8,777

 
8,354

Total assets
$
855,164

 
$
801,282

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
$
144,978

 
$
132,521

Accrued employee compensation and benefits
27,323

 
32,568

Asset-based credit facilities
6,231

 
11,966

Accrued warranty expense
5,969

 
5,395

Income tax liability
3,491

 
4,404

Total current liabilities
187,992

 
186,854

Long-term liabilities:
 
 
 
Income tax payable
3,729

 
3,608

Deferred taxes, net
1,734

 
1,596

Long-term incentive compensation and other
783

 
624

Commitments and contingencies (Note 11)

 

Shareholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 3,000,000 shares authorized, none issued and outstanding at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 240,000,000 shares authorized, 95,042,557 and 94,214,295 shares issued at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively
950

 
942

Additional paid-in capital
328,650

 
330,206

Retained earnings
342,300

 
287,129

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(12,905
)
 
(18,466
)
Less: Common stock held in treasury, at cost, 670,735 and 97,837 shares at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively
(7,201
)
 
(905
)
Total Callaway Golf Company shareholders’ equity
651,794

 
598,906

Non-controlling interest in consolidated entity (Note 7)
9,132

 
9,694

Total shareholders’ equity
660,926

 
608,600

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
$
855,164

 
$
801,282


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


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CALLAWAY GOLF COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Unaudited)
(In thousands, except per share data)
 
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Net sales
$
304,548

 
$
245,594

 
$
613,475

 
$
519,647

Cost of sales
156,383

 
134,961

 
317,595

 
276,622

Gross profit
148,165

 
110,633

 
295,880

 
243,025

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Selling expense
68,102

 
64,388

 
139,864

 
127,674

General and administrative expense
22,155

 
17,089

 
45,019

 
32,633

Research and development expense
8,863

 
8,288

 
17,745

 
16,522

Total operating expenses
99,120

 
89,765

 
202,628

 
176,829

Income from operations
49,045

 
20,868

 
93,252

 
66,196

Interest income
305

 
332

 
336

 
494

Interest expense
(855
)
 
(679
)
 
(1,601
)
 
(1,462
)
Gain on sale of investment in golf-related venture (Note 8)

 
17,662

 

 
17,662

Other expense, net
(971
)
 
(2,141
)
 
(5,377
)
 
(7,057
)
Income before income taxes
47,524

 
36,042

 
86,610

 
75,833

Income tax provision
16,050

 
1,937

 
29,256

 
3,338

Net income
31,474

 
34,105

 
57,354

 
72,495

Less: Net income attributable to non-controlling interest
31

 

 
222

 

Net income attributable to Callaway Golf Company
$
31,443

 
$
34,105

 
$
57,132

 
$
72,495

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
0.33

 
$
0.36

 
$
0.61

 
$
0.77

Diluted
$
0.33

 
$
0.36

 
$
0.59

 
$
0.76

Weighted-average common shares outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
94,213

 
94,029

 
94,142

 
93,990

Diluted
96,197

 
95,893

 
96,073

 
95,658

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dividends declared per common share
$
0.01

 
$
0.01

 
$
0.02

 
$
0.02














The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


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CALLAWAY GOLF COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Unaudited)
(In thousands)
 
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Net income
$
31,474

 
$
34,105

 
$
57,354

 
$
72,495

Other comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Change in fair value of derivative instruments
(462
)
 
64

 
(3,618
)
 
(2,223
)
Foreign currency translation adjustments
2,583

 
(1,143
)
 
8,571

 
3,618

Comprehensive income, before income tax on other comprehensive income items
33,595

 
33,026

 
62,307

 
73,890

Income tax benefit (expense) on derivative instruments
364

 
(29
)
 
798

 
62

Comprehensive income
33,959

 
32,997

 
63,105

 
73,952

Less: Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to non-controlling interest
(79
)
 

 
190

 

Comprehensive income attributable to Callaway Golf Company
$
34,038

 
$
32,997

 
$
62,915

 
$
73,952




 





























The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


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CALLAWAY GOLF COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
(In thousands)
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
Net income
$
57,354

 
$
72,495

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
8,497

 
8,337

Deferred taxes
33,028

 
(347
)
Share-based compensation
5,402

 
4,329

Loss (gain) on disposal of long-lived assets and deferred gain amortization
1,035

 
(124
)
Gain on sale of investment in golf-related venture

 
(17,662
)
Unrealized losses on foreign currency forward contracts
1,550

 
884

Change in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts receivable, net
(84,368
)
 
(86,452
)
Inventories
28,022

 
61,843

Other assets
(5,901
)
 
918

Accounts payable and accrued expenses
(10,335
)
 
(18,475
)
Accrued employee compensation and benefits
(5,695
)
 
(8,119
)
Accrued warranty expense
574

 
466

Income taxes receivable/payable, net
(2,941
)
 
(161
)
Other liabilities
102

 
(171
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
26,324

 
17,761

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
Acquisition, net of cash acquired
(57,890
)
 

Capital expenditures
(12,186
)
 
(7,487
)
Proceeds from sales of property and equipment
560

 
20

Proceeds from sale of investment in golf-related venture

 
23,429

Collection of note receivable

 
3,104

Investments in golf-related venture

 
(1,560
)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
(69,516
)
 
17,506

Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
Repayments of asset-based credit facilities, net
(5,735
)
 
(9,638
)
Acquisition of treasury stock
(16,410
)
 
(5,133
)
Dividends paid
(1,882
)
 
(1,882
)
Distribution to non-controlling interest
(974
)
 

Exercise of stock options
3,085

 
2,096

Net cash used in financing activities
(21,916
)
 
(14,557
)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
1,092

 
(2,892
)
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents
(64,016
)
 
17,818

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
125,975

 
49,801

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
61,959

 
$
67,619

Supplemental disclosures:
 
 
 
Cash paid for income taxes, net
$
6,217

 
$
3,920

Cash paid for interest and fees
$
1,179

 
$
1,109

Non-cash investing and financing activities:
 
 
 
Issuance of treasury stock for compensatory stock awards released from restriction
$
5,414

 
$
817

Accrued capital expenditures at period-end
$
1,661

 
$
640

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


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CALLAWAY GOLF COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENT OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(Unaudited)
(In thousands)
 
 
Shareholders' Equity Callaway Golf Company
 
 
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
Additional
Paid-in
Capital
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
 
Treasury Stock
 
Total Callaway Golf Company Shareholders' Equity
 
Non-
Controlling Interest
 
 

 
Shares
 
Amount
 
 
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
 
 
Total
Balance at December 31, 2016
94,214

 
$
942

 
$
330,206

 
$
287,129

 
 
$
(18,466
)
 
 
(98
)
 
$
(905
)
 
 
$
598,906

 
 
$
9,694

 
$
608,600

Acquisition of treasury stock

 

 

 

 
 

 
 
(1,522
)
 
(16,410
)
 
 
(16,410
)
 
 

 
(16,410
)
Exercise of stock options

 

 
(1,615
)
 

 
 

 
 
443

 
4,700

 
 
3,085

 
 

 
3,085

Compensatory awards released from restriction
825

 
8

 
(5,422
)
 

 
 

 
 
506

 
5,414

 
 

 
 

 

Share-based compensation

 

 
5,402

 

 
 

 
 

 

 
 
5,402

 
 

 
5,402

Stock dividends
4

 

 
79

 
(79
)
 
 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

 

Cash dividends

 

 

 
(1,882
)
 
 

 
 

 

 
 
(1,882
)
 
 

 
(1,882
)
Equity adjustment from foreign currency translation

 

 

 

 
 
8,381

 
 

 

 
 
8,381

 
 
190

 
8,571

Change in fair value of derivative instruments

 

 

 

 
 
(2,820
)
 
 

 

 
 
(2,820
)
 
 

 
(2,820
)
Distribution to non-controlling interest

 

 

 

 
 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 
(974
)
 
(974
)
Net income

 

 

 
57,132

 
 

 
 

 

 
 
57,132

 
 
222

 
57,354

Balance at June 30, 2017
95,043

 
$
950

 
$
328,650

 
$
342,300

 
 
$
(12,905
)
 
 
(671
)
 
$
(7,201
)
 
 
$
651,794

 
 
$
9,132

 
$
660,926





























The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


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CALLAWAY GOLF COMPANY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)
Note 1. Basis of Presentation
The accompanying unaudited consolidated condensed financial statements have been prepared by Callaway Golf Company (the “Company” or “Callaway Golf”) pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”). Accordingly, certain information and disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted. These consolidated condensed financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 filed with the Commission. These consolidated condensed financial statements, in the opinion of management, include all the normal and recurring adjustments necessary for the fair presentation of the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods and dates presented. Interim operating results are not necessarily indicative of operating results for the full year.
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates and assumptions.
Recent Accounting Standards
In March 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") No. 2016-09, "Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting." This amendment is intended to simplify several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions, including (i) the recognition of excess tax benefits or deficiencies in the operating statement when compensatory stock awards are vested and settled, and the presentation of these tax benefits or deficiencies as an operating cash outflow on the statement of cash flows, (ii) the option to withhold the maximum statutory tax rate on the settlement of compensatory stock without triggering liability accounting, as well as presenting the shares withheld for the settlement of these taxes as a financing outflow on the statement of cash flows, and (iii) the option to elect a change in the accounting policy to account for forfeitures as they occur. The amendment is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods therein. The Company adopted this ASU using the modified retrospective transition method with respect to the recognition of excess tax benefits in the consolidated condensed statement of operations. The adoption did not result in a cumulative-effect adjustment to equity as of January 1, 2017. The amendment related to the cash flow presentation of shares acquired to satisfy the Company's minimum tax withholding requirements in connection with the settlement of compensatory stock was applied retrospectively as a financing outflow. The adoption had no impact to any periods presented on the consolidated condensed statement of cash flows as these cash outflows have historically been presented as a financing activity. The Company elected not to change its accounting policy on the recognition of estimated forfeitures.
In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-04, "Liabilities—Extinguishment of Liabilities (Subtopic 405-20): Recognition of Breakage for Certain Prepaid Stored-Value Products." The amendment clarifies when it is acceptable to recognize the unredeemed portion of prepaid gift cards into income, and is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. As of June 30, 2017, the Company had $993,000 of deferred revenue related to unredeemed gift cards. The Company does not expect the adoption of this ASU will have a material impact on its consolidated condensed financial statements and disclosures.
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, "Leases (Topic 842)." Under the new guidance, lessees will be required to recognize the following for all leases (with the exception of short-term leases) at the commencement date: (i) a lease liability, which is a lessee's obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease, measured on a discounted basis; and (ii) a right-of-use asset, which is an asset that represents the lessee’s right to use, or control the use of, a specified asset for the lease term. Under the new guidance, lessor accounting is largely unchanged. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. Lessees (for capital and operating leases) and lessors (for sales-type, direct financing, and operating leases) must apply a modified retrospective transition approach for leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements. The modified retrospective approach would not require any transition accounting for leases that expired before the earliest comparative period


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presented. Lessees and lessors may not apply a full retrospective transition approach. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this ASU will have on its consolidated condensed financial statements and disclosures.
In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, "Financial Instruments─Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities." The amendment requires (i) equity investments (except those accounted for under the equity method of accounting, or those that result in consolidation of the investee) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income, (ii) public business entities to use the exit price notion when measuring the fair value of financial instruments for disclosure purposes and (iii) separate presentation of financial assets and financial liabilities by measurement category and form of financial asset (i.e., securities or loans and receivables). This amendment eliminates the requirement for public business entities to disclose the method(s) and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value for financial instruments measured at amortized cost. This amendment is effective for public companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. As of June 30, 2017, the Company had an investment in Topgolf International, Inc. of $48,997,000 that was accounted for at cost in accordance with ASC Topic 325, “Investments—Other” (see Note 8). Based on prior observable market transactions, the Company believes that the fair value of its investment in Topgolf significantly exceeds its cost. However, the Company is currently unable to estimate the fair value of this investment as of June 30, 2017, as it was not practical to do so, and there were no recent identifiable events or changes in circumstances that had a significant effect on fair value. If there are any observable price changes related to this investment or a similar investment of the same issuer in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, the Company would be required to write this investment up or down to its estimated fair value, which could have a significant effect on the Company's financial position and results of operations.
In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-11, "Inventory (Topic 330): Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory." This amendment requires an entity to measure in-scope inventory at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Net realizable value is the estimated selling prices in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable costs of completion, disposal, and transportation. For public business entities, this ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The adoption of this amendment did not have a material impact on the Company's consolidated condensed financial statements.
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers: (Topic 606)." This ASU affects any entity that either enters into contracts with customers to transfer goods or services or enters into contracts for the transfer of nonfinancial assets unless those contracts are within the scope of other standards (e.g., insurance contracts or lease contracts). The core principle of the guidance is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. This ASU also requires additional disclosures regarding revenue and contracts with customers. The amendments in this ASU are effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within that reporting period. Entities can adopt this ASU using the full retrospective application or the modified retrospective application. Early adoption is permitted only for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. The Company does not intend to early adopt the new standard, and is currently evaluating the transition method of adoption. The Company is currently comparing the requirements of this ASU with the current requirements for recognizing revenue and identifying the potential differences. The Company expects that this new standard will not change the total amount of revenue recognized, but rather will shift the timing of when certain sales promotions are recognized to earlier in the product life cycle. The Company is currently unable to quantify the impact of this ASU on its consolidated financial statements until the Company has completed its full analysis.
Note 2. Business Combinations
Acquisition of OGIO International, Inc.
On January 11, 2017, the Company acquired all of the outstanding shares of capital stock of OGIO International, Inc. (“OGIO”), a leading manufacturer of high quality bags, accessories and apparel in the golf and lifestyle categories, in a cash transaction pursuant to the terms of a Share Purchase Agreement, by and among the Company, OGIO, and each of the shareholders and option holders of OGIO. The primary reason for the acquisition was to enhance the Company's presence in golf while also providing a platform for future growth in the lifestyle category.
The purchase price of the acquisition was allocated to the underlying assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their estimated fair values as of the date of acquisition in accordance with ASC Topic 820, "Fair Value Measurement." The excess between the purchase price and the fair value of the net identifiable tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed


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was allocated to goodwill. The Company determined the estimated fair values after review and consideration of relevant information, including discounted cash flows, quoted market prices and estimates made by management. The Company may adjust the purchase price allocation, as necessary, during the measurement period of up to one year after the acquisition closing date as it obtains more information as to facts and circumstances existing as of the acquisition date.
The acquired trade names/trademarks, customer and distributor relationships, inventory and non-compete agreements are subject to fair value measurements that were based primarily on significant inputs not observable in the market and thus represent Level 3 measurements (see Note 13). The fair value of furniture, fixtures, office equipment, leasehold improvements, computer equipment and warehouse equipment were all valued at their replacement cost, which the Company determined was the net book value of the assets on the date of the acquisition. Inventory was valued using the net realizable value approach, which was based on the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business less reasonable disposal costs. The customer and distributor relationships were valued under the income approach based on the present value of future earnings. The trade name was valued under the royalty savings income approach method, which is equal to the present value of the after-tax royalty savings attributable to owning the trade name as opposed to paying a third party for its use. For this valuation the Company used a royalty rate of 7.5%, which is reflective of royalty rates paid in market transactions, and a discount rate of 14.0% on the future cash flows generated by the net after-tax savings. The goodwill of $5,543,000 arising from the acquisition consists largely of the synergies expected from combining the operations of the Company and OGIO. The acquisition is treated as an asset purchase for tax purposes. As such, the Company expects to deduct all of the intangible assets for income tax purposes. All of the goodwill was assigned to the gear, accessories and other operating segment.
At the acquisition date, the total purchase price was valued at approximately $66,032,000. Due to the subsequent measurement of liabilities assumed in the acquisition, the purchase price was reduced to $65,951,000 as of June 30, 2017. The Company incurred transaction costs of approximately $3,052,000, of which $1,805,000 was recognized in general and administrative expenses during the six months ended June 30, 2017. The remainder was recognized in 2016.
The pro-forma effects of this acquisition would not have been material to the Company's results of operations in 2016 and are therefore not presented. The following table summarizes the estimated fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date based on the purchase price allocation (in thousands):
 
At January 11, 2017
Assets Acquired
 
 
Cash
 
$
8,061

Accounts receivable
 
8,038

Inventory
 
7,092

Other current assets
 
328

Property and equipment
 
2,369

Intangibles - trade name
 
49,700

Intangibles - customer lists
 
1,500

Intangibles - non-compete agreements
 
150

Goodwill
 
5,543

Total assets acquired
 
82,781

Liabilities Assumed
 
 
Accounts Payable and accrued liabilities
 
16,830

Net assets acquired
 
$
65,951

Note 3. Financing Arrangements
In addition to cash on hand, as well as cash generated from operations, the Company relies on its primary and Japan asset-based revolving credit facilities to manage seasonal fluctuations in liquidity and to provide additional liquidity when the Company’s operating cash flows are not sufficient to fund the Company’s requirements. As of June 30, 2017, the Company had $6,231,000 in borrowings outstanding under all facilities, $861,000 in outstanding letters of credit, and $61,959,000 in cash and cash equivalents. At June 30, 2016, the Company had $5,331,000 in borrowings outstanding under all facilities, $951,000 in outstanding letters of credit, and $67,619,000 in cash and cash equivalents. The combined maximum amount that could have been outstanding under all facilities on June 30, 2017, after letters of credit, was $174,340,000, resulting in total available liquidity including cash on hand


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of $236,299,000 compared to the maximum amount that could have been outstanding under all facilities on June 30, 2016, after letters of credit, of $148,712,000, resulting in total available liquidity including cash on hand of $216,331,000.
Primary Asset-Based Revolving Credit Facility
The Company's primary credit facility is a Loan and Security Agreement with Bank of America N.A. and other lenders (as amended, the “ABL Facility”), which provides a senior secured asset-based revolving credit facility of up to $230,000,000, comprised of a $160,000,000 U.S. facility, a $25,000,000 Canadian facility and a $45,000,000 United Kingdom facility, in each case subject to borrowing base availability under the applicable facility. The amounts outstanding under the ABL Facility are secured by certain assets, including cash (to the extent pledged by the Company), inventory and accounts receivable of the Company’s subsidiaries in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.
As of June 30, 2017, the Company had no borrowings outstanding under the ABL Facility and $861,000 in outstanding letters of credit. The maximum amount of additional indebtedness (as defined by the ABL Facility) that could have been outstanding on June 30, 2017, after outstanding borrowings and letters of credit, was approximately $151,398,000. The maximum availability under the ABL Facility fluctuates with the general seasonality of the business and increases and decreases with changes in the Company’s inventory and accounts receivable balances. The maximum availability is at its highest during the first half of the year when the Company’s inventory and accounts receivable balances are higher and is lower during the second half of the year when the Company's inventory levels decrease and its accounts receivable decrease as a result of cash collections and lower sales. Average outstanding borrowings during the six months ended June 30, 2017 were $39,500,000, and the average amount available under the ABL Facility during the six months ended June 30, 2017, after outstanding borrowings and letters of credit, was approximately $121,065,000. Amounts borrowed under the ABL Facility may be repaid and borrowed as needed. The entire outstanding principal amount (if any) is due and payable on June 23, 2019.
The ABL Facility includes certain restrictions including, among other things, restrictions on the incurrence of additional debt, liens, stock repurchases and other restricted payments, asset sales, investments, mergers, acquisitions and affiliate transactions. In addition, the ABL Facility imposes restrictions on the amount the Company could pay in annual cash dividends, including meeting certain restrictions on the amount of additional indebtedness and requirements to maintain a certain fixed charge coverage ratio under certain circumstances. The "fixed charge coverage ratio" is the ratio of (i) the 12-month trailing EBITDA (as defined in the ABL Facility) adjusted for capital expenditures and taxes paid, to (ii) interest expense and certain distributions paid in the trailing 12-month period adjusted for debt amortization, if any. These restrictions do not materially limit the Company's ability to pay future dividends at the current dividend rate. As of June 30, 2017, the Company was in compliance with all financial covenants of the ABL Facility. Additionally, the Company is subject to compliance with a fixed charge coverage ratio covenant during, and continuing 30 days after, any period in which the Company’s borrowing base availability, as amended, falls below $23,000,000. The Company’s borrowing base availability was above $23,000,000 during the six months ended June 30, 2017, and the Company was in compliance with the fixed charge coverage ratio as of June 30, 2017. Had the Company not been in compliance with the fixed charge coverage ratio as of June 30, 2017, the Company's maximum amount of additional indebtedness that could have been outstanding on June 30, 2017 would have been reduced by $23,000,000.
The interest rate applicable to outstanding loans under the ABL Facility fluctuates depending on the Company’s “availability ratio," which is expressed as a percentage of (i) the average daily availability under the ABL Facility to (ii) the sum of the Canadian, the U.K. and the U.S. borrowing bases, as adjusted. The applicable margin for any month could be reduced by 0.25% if the Company’s availability ratio is greater than or equal to 67% and the Company’s “leverage ratio” (as defined below) is less than 4.0 to 1.0 as of the last day of the month for which financial statements have been delivered, so long as no default or event of default exists. The Company’s “leverage ratio” is the ratio of the amount of debt for borrowed money to the 12-month trailing EBITDA (as defined in the ABL Facility), each determined on a consolidated basis. At June 30, 2017, the Company’s trailing 12 month average interest rate applicable to its outstanding loans under the ABL Facility, not including the fees described below, was 3.03%.
The ABL Facility provides for monthly fees ranging from 0.25% to 0.375% of the unused portion of the ABL Facility, depending on the prior month’s average daily balance of revolver loans and stated amount of letters of credit relative to lenders’ commitments.
The fees incurred in connection with the origination and amendment of the ABL Facility totaled $5,021,000, which are amortized into interest expense over the term of the ABL Facility agreement. Unamortized fees at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 totaled $1,065,000 and $1,297,000, respectively, of which $532,000 and $519,000 were included in other current assets,


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respectively, and $533,000 and $778,000 were included in other assets, respectively, in the accompanying consolidated condensed balance sheets.
In July 2017, the Company amended the ABL Facility and entered into a stretch term loan facility ("Stretch Facility") for $60,000,000 that is in addition to the amounts available under the ABL Facility. Loans under the Stretch Facility ("Term Loans") bear interest at the current rates under the ABL Facility, plus 250 basis points. The Stretch Facility matures on the earlier of (i) four years from the commencement date of the facility and (ii) the maturity of the ABL Facility, and amortizes over a three year period, beginning in the second year of the facility. The Company must maintain a fixed charge coverage ratio of at least 1.0 to 1.0 and a leverage ratio of 4.0 to 1.0 or less at any time when there is $20,000,000 or more outstanding in Term Loans. The Stretch Facility is collateralized by the same assets as those under the ABL Facility, and is subject to certain restrictions, including placing liens on certain assets, in addition to limits on certain distributions.
Japan ABL Facilities
The Company has a separate asset-based loan and guarantee agreement, as amended, between its subsidiary in Japan and The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFG, Ltd and The Development Bank of Japan, which provides a credit facility of up to 2,000,000,000 Yen (or U.S. $17,802,000, using the exchange rate in effect as of June 30, 2017) over a two-year term, subject to borrowing base availability under the facility. The amounts outstanding are secured by certain assets, including eligible inventory. The Company had 700,000,000 Yen (or U.S. $6,231,000) in borrowings outstanding under this facility as of June 30, 2017. The maximum amount that could have been outstanding at June 30, 2017 was 1,578,172,000 Yen (or U.S. $14,042,000). The facility also includes certain restrictions including covenants related to certain pledged assets and financial performance metrics. As of June 30, 2017, the Company was in compliance with these covenants. This facility is subject to an effective interest rate equal to TIBOR plus 0.25%. At June 30, 2017, the trailing 12-month average interest rate applicable to the Company's outstanding loans under this facility together with fees was 0.30%.
During the first quarter of 2017, the Company entered into a second asset-based loan between its subsidiary in Japan and The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFG, Ltd, which provides a credit facility of up to 1,000,000,000 Yen (or U.S. $8,898,000) over a 10-month term, subject to borrowing base availability under the facility. The amounts outstanding are secured by certain assets, including eligible accounts receivable. The Company had no borrowings outstanding under this facility as of June 30, 2017. The maximum amount that could have been outstanding at June 30, 2017 was 1,000,000,000 Yen (or U.S. $8,898,000). The facility also includes certain restrictions including covenants related to certain pledged assets and financial performance metrics. As of June 30, 2017, the Company was in compliance with these covenants. This facility is subject to an effective interest rate equal to TIBOR plus 0.75%. At June 30, 2017, the trailing 12-month average interest rate applicable to the Company's outstanding loans under this facility was 0.78%.
Both facilities (the "Japan ABL Facilities") expire in January 2018.
Note 4. Earnings per Common Share
Basic earnings per common share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period.
Diluted earnings per common share reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities, or other contracts to issue common stock, were exercised. Dilutive securities are included in the calculation of diluted earnings per common share using the treasury stock method in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") Topic 260, “Earnings per Share.” Dilutive securities include options granted pursuant to the Company’s stock option plans and outstanding restricted stock units and performance share units granted to employees and non-employee directors (see Note 12).
Weighted-average common shares outstanding—diluted is the same as weighted-average common shares outstanding—basic in periods when a net loss is reported or in periods when anti-dilution occurs.  


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The following table summarizes the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share (in thousands, except per share data):
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Earnings per common share—basic
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to Callaway Golf Company
$
31,443

 
$
34,105

 
$
57,132

 
$
72,495

Weighted-average common shares outstanding—basic
94,213

 
94,029

 
94,142

 
93,990

Basic earnings per common share
$
0.33

 
$
0.36

 
$
0.61

 
$
0.77

Earnings per common share—diluted
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to Callaway Golf Company
$
31,443

 
$
34,105

 
$
57,132

 
$
72,495

Weighted-average common shares outstanding—basic
94,213

 
94,029

 
94,142

 
93,990

Options and restricted stock
1,984

 
1,864

 
1,931

 
1,668

Weighted-average common shares outstanding—diluted
96,197

 
95,893

 
96,073

 
95,658

Dilutive earnings per common share
$
0.33

 
$
0.36

 
$
0.59

 
$
0.76

For the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, securities outstanding totaling approximately 131,000 shares and 309,000 shares, respectively, comprised of stock options, have been excluded from the calculation of earnings per common share—diluted as their effect would be antidilutive. For the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, securities outstanding totaling approximately 141,000 shares and 361,000 shares, respectively, comprised of stock options and restricted stock units, have been excluded from the calculation of earnings per common share—diluted as their effect would be antidilutive.
Note 5. Inventories
Inventories are summarized below (in thousands):
 
June 30,
2017
 
December 31,
2016
Inventories:
 
 
 
Raw materials
$
47,243

 
$
46,451

Work-in-process
778

 
739

Finished goods
123,759

 
142,210

 
$
171,780

 
$
189,400

Note 6. Goodwill and Intangible Assets
Goodwill and intangible assets, consisting of trade names, trademarks, trade dress, patents and other intangible assets, were acquired in connection with the acquisition of Odyssey Sports, Inc. in 1997, FrogTrader, Inc. in 2004, (which represents the Company's pre-owned business), OGIO in 2017 (see Note 2) and certain foreign distributors. Internally developed intangible assets are expensed as incurred.
The Company’s goodwill and acquired intangible assets with indefinite lives are not amortized, but are subject to an annual impairment test. The Company performs an impairment analysis on its goodwill and intangible assets at least annually and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of such assets may not be fully recoverable. Acquired intangible assets with definite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives and are tested for impairment only when impairment indicators are present.
Goodwill at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 was $31,908,000 and $25,593,000, respectively. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company recorded an addition to goodwill of $5,543,000 as a result of the OGIO acquisition completed in January 2017. In addition, the goodwill balance increased $772,000 due to foreign currency fluctuations during the period.


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The following sets forth the intangible assets by major asset class (dollars in thousands):
 
Useful
Life
(Years)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Gross
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net Book
Value
 
Gross
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net Book
Value
Non-Amortizing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trade name, trademark and trade dress and other
NA
 
$
138,290

 
 
$

 
 
$
138,290

 
$
88,590

 
 
$

 
 
$
88,590

Amortizing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Patents
2-16
 
31,581

 
 
31,466

 
 
115

 
31,581

 
 
31,440

 
 
141

Other
1-10
 
9,631

 
 
8,076

 
 
1,555

 
7,981

 
 
7,981

 
 

Total intangible assets
 
 
$
179,502

 
 
$
39,542

 
 
$
139,960

 
$
128,152

 
 
$
39,421

 
 
$
88,731

The increase in intangible assets is related to the acquisition of non-amortizing trademarks in addition to amortizing intangibles in connection with the OGIO acquisition. Aggregate amortization expense related to intangible assets was approximately $121,000 and $25,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively.
Amortization expense related to intangible assets at June 30, 2017 in each of the next five fiscal years and beyond is expected to be incurred as follows (in thousands):
Remainder of 2017
$
126

2018
251

2019
238

2020
151

2021
150

2022
150

Thereafter
604

 
$
1,670

Note 7. Joint Venture
Effective July 1, 2016, the Company completed a joint venture, Callaway Apparel K.K. with its long-time apparel licensee, TSI Groove & Sports Co, Ltd., ("TSI"), a premier apparel manufacturer in Japan. The joint venture designs, manufactures and distributes Callaway-branded apparel, footwear and headwear in Japan. The Company contributed $10,556,000, primarily in cash, for a 52% ownership of the joint venture, and TSI contributed $9,744,000, primarily in inventory, for the remaining 48%. The Company has a majority voting percentage on matters pertaining to the business operations and significant management decisions of the joint venture, and as such, the Company consolidates the financial results of the joint venture with the financial results of the Company. The joint venture is consolidated one month in arrears.
As a result of the consolidation, during the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company recorded net income attributable to the non-controlling interest of $31,000 and $222,000, respectively, in its consolidated condensed statement of operations. During the three months ended June 30, 2017, the joint venture paid a dividend of $974,000 to TSI, which was recorded as a reduction in non-controlling interests in the consolidated condensed financial statements as of June 30, 2017. Total non-controlling interests on the Company's consolidated condensed financial statements was $9,132,000 and $9,694,000 at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively.
Note 8. Investments
Investment in Topgolf International, Inc.
The Company owns a minority interest in Topgolf International, Inc., doing business as the Topgolf Entertainment Group (“Topgolf”), the owner and operator of Topgolf entertainment centers, which ownership consists of common stock and various classes of preferred stock. In connection with this investment, the Company has a preferred partner agreement with Topgolf in which the Company has preferred signage rights, rights as the preferred supplier of golf products used or offered for use at Topgolf


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facilities at prices no less than those paid by the Company’s customers, preferred retail positioning in Topgolf retail stores, access to consumer information obtained by Topgolf, and other rights incidental to those listed above.
The Company did not make any additional investment in Topgolf during the six months ended June 30, 2017. During the six months ended June 30, 2016, the Company invested an additional $1,260,000 in preferred shares of Topgolf. In addition, in December 2015, the Company and Topgolf entered into a shareholder loan agreement, which resulted in a note receivable from Topgolf for $3,200,000. The loan was subject to an annual interest rate of 10.0% and was due and payable on March 30, 2016. The loan was paid in full in February 2016.
In February 2016, Topgolf announced that Providence Equity Partners L.L.C. (“Providence Equity”) made a significant minority preferred stock investment in Topgolf (the “Providence Equity Investment”). As required by the terms of the Providence Equity Investment, Topgolf used a portion of the proceeds it received to repurchase shares from its existing shareholders, other than Providence Equity (the “Topgolf Repurchase Program”). In April 2016, the Company sold approximately 10.0% or $5,767,000 (on a cost basis) of its preferred shares in Topgolf under the Topgolf Repurchase Program for $23,429,000, and recognized a gain of approximately $17,662,000 in other income (expense) during the second quarter of 2016.
As of each of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the Company's total investment in Topgolf was $48,997,000. The Company's ownership percentage at June 30, 2017 was approximately in the range of 14.0% to 15.0%. As of June 30, 2017, there were no impairment indicators present with respect to this investment. Based on prior observable market transactions, the Company believes that the fair value of its investment in Topgolf significantly exceeds its cost. However, the Company is currently unable to estimate the fair value of this investment as of June 30, 2017, as it was not practicable to do so and there were no recent identified events or changes in circumstances that had a significant effect on the fair value. In fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, in accordance with Subtopic 825-10 issued in January 2016, the Company would be required to report this investment at its estimated fair value, which could have a significant effect on the Company's financial position and results of operations. For further discussion, see "Recent Accounting Standards in Note 1.
The Company’s total ownership interest in Topgolf, including the Company's voting rights in the preferred shares of Topgolf, remains at less than 20.0% of the outstanding equity securities of Topgolf. As of June 30, 2017, the Company did not have the ability to significantly influence the operating and financing activities and policies of Topgolf, and accordingly, the Company’s investment in Topgolf is accounted for at cost in accordance with ASC Topic 325, “Investments—Other.”
Note 9. Product Warranty
The Company has a stated two-year warranty policy for its golf clubs. The Company’s policy is to accrue the estimated cost of satisfying future warranty claims at the time the sale is recorded. In estimating its future warranty obligations, the Company considers various relevant factors, including the Company’s stated warranty policies and practices, the historical frequency of claims, and the cost to replace or repair its products under warranty.
The following table provides a reconciliation of the activity related to the Company’s reserve for accrued warranty expense (in thousands):
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Beginning balance
$
5,945

 
$
6,350

 
$
5,395

 
$
5,706

Provision
2,202

 
1,503

 
4,124

 
3,240

Claims paid/costs incurred
(2,178
)
 
(1,681
)
 
(3,550
)
 
(2,774
)
Ending balance
$
5,969

 
$
6,172

 
$
5,969

 
$
6,172

Note 10. Income Taxes
The Company calculates its interim income tax provision in accordance with ASC 270, “Interim Reporting,” and ASC 740 “Accounting for Income Taxes” (together, “ASC 740”). At the end of each interim period, the Company estimates its annual effective tax rate and applies that rate to its ordinary quarterly earnings to calculate the tax related to ordinary income. The tax effects for other items that are excluded from ordinary income are discretely calculated and recognized in the period in which they occur.


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The realization of deferred tax assets, including loss and credit carryforwards, is subject to the Company generating sufficient taxable income during the periods in which the deferred tax assets become realizable. Due to the Company’s improved profitability in 2015 and 2016, combined with future projections of profitability, the Company determined that the majority of its U.S. deferred tax assets were more likely than not to be realized and reversed a significant portion of the valuation allowance against those deferred tax assets as of December 31, 2016. The remaining valuation allowance on the Company’s U.S. deferred tax assets as of June 30, 2017 primarily relates to state net operating loss carryforwards and credits the Company estimates it may not be able to utilize in future periods. With respect to non-U.S. entities, there continues to be sufficient positive evidence to conclude that realization of its deferred tax assets is more likely than not under applicable accounting rules, and therefore no significant valuation allowances have been established.
The income tax provision for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 was $16,050,000 and $1,937,000, respectively. The increase was primarily due to the recognition of income tax expense on the Company’s U.S. operations during the second quarter of 2017 as a result of the reversal of a significant portion of the valuation allowance on the Company's deferred tax assets in the United States in the fourth quarter of 2016. During the second quarter of 2016, the Company's full valuation allowance established against the Company's U.S. deferred tax assets resulted in minimal U.S. tax expense recorded for the quarter. The income tax provision for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 was $29,256,000 and $3,338,000, respectively. The increase was primarily due to the recognition of income tax expense on the Company’s U.S. operations during the first six months of 2017 as a result of the reversal of a significant portion of the valuation allowance on the Company's deferred tax assets in the United States in the fourth quarter of 2016.
At June 30, 2017, the gross liability for income taxes associated with uncertain tax positions was $8,745,000. Of this amount, $1,361,000 would benefit the Company’s consolidated condensed financial statements and effective income tax rate if favorably settled. The unrecognized tax benefit liabilities are expected to decrease by approximately $390,000 during the next 12 months. The gross liability for uncertain tax positions increased by $233,000 and $489,000 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively. The increase was primarily due to increases for tax positions expected to be taken in the current tax year.
The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to income tax matters in income tax expense. For the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company's provision for income taxes includes expense of $62,000 and $54,000, respectively, related to the recognition of interest and penalties. For the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company's provision for income taxes includes expense of $109,000 and $29,000, respectively. As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the gross amount of accrued interest and penalties included in income taxes payable in the accompanying consolidated condensed balance sheets was $1,426,000 and $1,317,000, respectively.
The Company files income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction and various state and foreign jurisdictions. The Company is generally no longer subject to income tax examinations by tax authorities in the following major jurisdictions:
Tax Jurisdiction
 
Years No Longer Subject to Audit
U.S. federal
 
2010 and prior
California (United States)
 
2008 and prior
Canada
 
2009 and prior
Japan
 
2010 and prior
South Korea
 
2011 and prior
United Kingdom
 
2012 and prior
Pursuant to Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code, use of the Company's net operating losses and credit carry-forwards may be limited significantly if the Company were to experience a cumulative change in ownership of the Company's stock by “5-percent shareholders” that exceeds 50% over a rolling three-year period. The Company does not believe there has been a cumulative change in ownership in excess of 50% during any rolling three-year period, and the Company continues to monitor changes in its ownership. If such a cumulative change did occur in any three-year period and the Company were limited in the amount of losses it could use to offset taxable income, the Company's results of operations and cash flows could be adversely impacted.


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Note 11. Commitments & Contingencies
Legal Matters
The Company is subject to routine legal claims, proceedings and investigations incident to its business activities, including claims, proceedings, and investigations relating to commercial disputes and employment matters. The Company also receives from time to time information claiming that products sold by the Company infringe or may infringe patent, trademark or other intellectual property rights of third parties. One or more such claims of potential infringement could lead to litigation, the need to obtain licenses, the need to alter a product to avoid infringement, a settlement or judgment or some other action or material loss by the Company, which also could adversely affect the Company’s overall ability to protect its product designs and ultimately limit its future success in the marketplace. In addition, the Company is occasionally subject to non-routine claims, proceedings or investigations.
The Company regularly assesses such matters to determine the degree of probability that the Company will incur a material loss as a result of such matters as well as the range of possible loss. An estimated loss contingency is accrued in the Company’s financial statements if it is probable the Company will incur a loss and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. The Company reviews all claims, proceedings and investigations at least quarterly and establishes or adjusts any accruals for such matters to reflect the impact of negotiations, settlements, advice of legal counsel and other information and events pertaining to a particular matter. All legal costs associated with such matters are expensed as incurred.
Historically, the claims, proceedings and investigations brought against the Company, individually and in the aggregate, have not had a material adverse effect on the consolidated results of operations, cash flows or financial position of the Company. The Company believes that it has valid legal defenses to the matters currently pending against the Company. These matters are inherently unpredictable and the resolutions of these matters are subject to many uncertainties and the outcomes are not predictable with assurance. Consequently, management is unable to estimate the ultimate aggregate amount of monetary loss, amounts covered by insurance or the financial impact that will result from such matters. In addition, the Company cannot assure that it will be able to successfully defend itself in those matters or that any amounts accrued are sufficient.  The Company does not believe that the matters currently pending against the Company will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated business, financial condition, cash flows or results of operations.
Unconditional Purchase Obligations
During the normal course of its business, the Company enters into agreements to purchase goods and services, including purchase commitments for production materials, as well as endorsement agreements with professional golfers and other endorsers, employment and consulting agreements, and intellectual property licensing agreements pursuant to which the Company is required to pay royalty fees. It is not possible to determine the amounts the Company will ultimately be required to pay under these agreements as they are subject to many variables including performance-based bonuses, severance arrangements, the Company’s sales levels, and reductions in payment obligations if designated minimum performance criteria are not achieved. As of June 30, 2017, the Company has entered into many of these contractual agreements with terms ranging from one to six years. The minimum obligation that the Company is required to pay under these agreements is $69,717,000 over the next six years. In addition, the Company also enters into unconditional purchase obligations with various vendors and suppliers of goods and services in the normal course of operations through purchase orders or other documentation or that are undocumented except for an invoice. Such unconditional purchase obligations are generally outstanding for periods less than a year and are settled by cash payments upon delivery of goods and services and are not reflected in this total. Future minimum commitments as of June 30, 2017, are as follows (in thousands):
Remainder of 2017
$
40,542

2018
16,706

2019
7,188

2020
3,624

2021
1,654

2022
3

 
$
69,717

Other Contingent Contractual Obligations
During its normal course of business, the Company has made certain indemnities, commitments and guarantees under which it may be required to make payments in relation to certain transactions. These include (i) intellectual property indemnities to the


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Company’s customers and licensees in connection with the use, sale and/or license of Company product or trademarks, (ii) indemnities to various lessors in connection with facility leases for certain claims arising from such facilities or leases, (iii) indemnities to vendors and service providers pertaining to the goods and services provided to the Company or based on the negligence or willful misconduct of the Company and (iv) indemnities involving the accuracy of representations and warranties in certain contracts. In addition, the Company has consulting agreements that provide for payment of nominal fees upon the issuance of patents and/or the commercialization of research results. The Company has also issued guarantees in the form of standby letters of credit of $861,000 as of June 30, 2017.
The duration of these indemnities, commitments and guarantees varies, and in certain cases, may be indefinite. The majority of these indemnities, commitments and guarantees do not provide for any limitation on the maximum amount of future payments the Company could be obligated to make. Historically, costs incurred to settle claims related to indemnities have not been material to the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows. In addition, the Company believes the likelihood is remote that payments under the commitments and guarantees described above will have a material effect on the Company’s financial condition. The fair value of indemnities, commitments and guarantees that the Company issued during the six months ended June 30, 2017 was not material to the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
Employment Contracts
In addition, the Company has made contractual commitments to each of its officers and certain other employees providing for severance payments, including salary continuation, upon the termination of employment by the Company without substantial cause or by the officer for good reason or non-renewal. In addition, in order to assure that the officers would continue to provide independent leadership consistent with the Company’s best interest, the contracts also generally provide for certain protections in the event of a change in control of the Company. These protections include the payment of certain severance benefits, such as monetary payments and health benefits, upon the termination of employment following a change in control.
Note 12. Share-Based Employee Compensation
As of June 30, 2017, the Company had two shareholder approved stock plans under which shares were available for equity-based awards: the Callaway Golf Company Amended and Restated 2004 Incentive Plan (the "2004 Incentive Plan") and the 2013 Non-Employee Directors Stock Incentive Plan (the "2013 Directors Plan"). From time to time, the Company grants stock options, restricted stock units, performance share units, phantom stock units, stock appreciation rights and other awards under these plans.
The table below summarizes the amounts recognized in the financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 for share-based compensation, including expense for stock options, restricted stock units, phantom stock units, cash settled stock appreciation rights and performance share units.
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
 
(In thousands)
 
 
 
 
Cost of sales
$
146

 
$
180

 
$
363

 
$
322

Operating expenses
2,039

 
2,303

 
5,007

 
4,213

Total cost of share-based compensation included in income, before income tax
$
2,185

 
$
2,483

 
$
5,370

 
$
4,535

Stock Options
Stock options granted under the 2004 Incentive Plan are valued using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model on the date of grant. The model uses various assumptions, including a risk-free interest rate, the estimated term of the options, the estimated stock price volatility, and the estimated dividend yield. Compensation expense for stock options is recognized over the vesting period and is reduced by an estimate for forfeitures, which is based on the Company’s historical forfeitures of unvested options and awards.
There were no stock options granted during the first six months of 2017 or 2016. Total compensation expense recognized for stock options during the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 was $9,000 and $8,000, respectively. Total compensation expense recognized for stock options during the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 was $17,000 and $129,000, respectively. At June 30, 2017, the total amount of unamortized expense related to stock options was $31,000, which will be recognized over a weighted-average period of 0.9 years.


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Restricted Stock Units
Restricted stock units awarded under the 2004 Incentive Plan and the 2013 Directors Plan are recorded at the Company’s closing stock price on the date of grant. Restricted stock units generally vest over a one- to three-year period. Compensation expense for restricted stock units is recognized over the vesting period and is reduced by an estimate for forfeitures. During the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company granted 60,000 and 43,000 shares underlying restricted stock units, respectively, at a weighted average grant-date fair value of $12.04 and $9.22, respectively. During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company granted 526,000 and 539,000 shares underlying restricted stock units, respectively, at a weighted average grant-date fair value of $10.35 and $8.66, respectively.
Total compensation expense, net of estimated forfeitures, recognized for restricted stock units during the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 was $1,439,000 and $1,062,000, respectively, and $2,660,000 and $2,102,000, for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. At June 30, 2017, the Company had $9,395,000 of total unamortized compensation expense related to non-vested restricted stock units under the Company’s share-based payment plans. That cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.6 years.
Performance Share Units
Performance share units granted under the 2004 Incentive Plan are stock-based awards in which the number of shares ultimately received depends on the Company's performance against specified metrics over a one- to three-year performance period from the date of grant. These performance metrics are established by the Company at the beginning of the performance period. At the end of the performance period, the number of shares of stock that could be issued is fixed based upon the degree of achievement of the performance goals. The number of shares that could be issued can range from 0% to 200% of the participant's target award. Performance share units are initially valued at the Company's closing stock price on the date of grant. Compensation expense, net of estimated forfeitures, is recognized over the vesting period and will vary based on the anticipated performance level during the performance period. If the performance metrics are not probable of achievement during the performance period, compensation expense would be reversed. The awards are forfeited if the threshold performance metrics are not achieved as of the end of the performance period. The performance share units cliff-vest in full on the third anniversary of the date of grant.
The Company granted 370,000 and 420,000 shares underlying performance share units during the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, at a weighted average grant-date fair value of $10.10 and $8.61 per share, respectively. There were no shares underlying performance share units granted during the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016. The awards granted in 2017 and 2016 are subject to a three-year performance period provided that (i) if certain first year performance goals are achieved, the participant could earn up to 50% of the three-year target award shares, subject to continued service through the vesting date, and (ii) if certain cumulative first- and second-year performance goals are achieved, the participant could earn up to an aggregate of 80% of the three-year target award shares (which includes any shares earned during the first year), subject to continued service through the vesting date. Based on the Company’s performance in 2016, participants earned a minimum of 50% of the target award shares granted in 2016, subject to continued service through the vesting date.
During the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized total compensation expense, net of estimated forfeitures, for performance share units of $737,000 and $1,064,000, respectively, and $2,725,000 and $2,097,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. At June 30, 2017, unamortized compensation expense related to these awards was $8,411,000, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.5 years.
Stock Appreciation Rights
Cash settled stock appreciation rights ("SARs") granted under the 2004 Incentive Plan are valued using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model on the date of grant. SARs are subsequently remeasured at each interim reporting period based on a revised Black-Scholes value until they are exercised. SARs generally vest over a three-year period. As of June 30, 2017, all outstanding SARs were fully vested.
There were no SARs granted during the first six months of 2017 or 2016. The Company reversed $32,000 and recognized $350,000 of compensation expense related to previously granted SARs during the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and recognized $0 and $207,000 of compensation expense related to previously granted SARs during the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. Accrued compensation expense for these awards was $0 and $224,000 at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively, which was recorded in accrued employee compensation and benefits in the accompanying consolidated condensed balance sheets.


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Note 13. Fair Value of Financial Instruments
Certain of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities are measured at fair value on a recurring and nonrecurring basis. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or the price paid to transfer a liability (the exit price) in the principal and most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants. Assets and liabilities carried at fair value are classified using the following three-tier hierarchy:
Level 1: Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;
Level 2: Quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and model-derived valuations in which significant inputs and significant value drivers are observable in active markets; and
Level 3: Fair value measurements derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.
The following table summarizes the valuation of the Company’s foreign currency forward contracts (see Note 14) that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis by the above pricing levels at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 (in thousands):
 
Fair
Value
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
June 30, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency forward contracts—asset position
$
328

 
$

 
$
328

 
$

Foreign currency forward contracts—liability position
(3,454
)
 

 
(3,454
)
 

 
$
(3,126
)
 
$

 
$
(3,126
)
 
$

December 31, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency forward contracts—asset position
$
3,524

 
$

 
$
3,524

 
$

Foreign currency forward contracts—liability position
(85
)
 

 
(85
)
 

 
$
3,439

 
$

 
$
3,439

 
$

The fair value of the Company’s foreign currency forward contracts is based on observable inputs that are corroborated by market data. Observable inputs include broker quotes, daily market foreign currency rates and forward pricing curves. Remeasurement gains and losses on foreign currency forward contracts designated as cash flow hedges are recorded in other comprehensive income, and in other income (expense) for non-designated foreign currency forward contracts (see Note 14).
Disclosures about the Fair Value of Financial Instruments
The carrying values of cash and cash equivalents at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 are categorized within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy due to the short-term nature of these balances. The table below illustrates information about fair value relating to the Company’s financial assets and liabilities that are recognized in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, as well as the fair value of contingent contracts that represent financial instruments (in thousands).
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Carrying
Value
 
Fair
Value
 
Carrying
Value
 
Fair 
Value
Japan ABL Facilities(1)
$
6,231

 
$
6,231

 
$
11,966

 
$
11,966

Standby letters of credit(2)
$
861

 
$
861

 
$
823

 
$
823

Money market funds(3)
$

 
$

 
$
69,081

 
$
69,081

 
(1)
The carrying value of the amount outstanding under the Company's Japan ABL Facilities approximates the fair value due to the short-term nature of these obligations. The fair value of this debt is categorized within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. See Note 2 for information on the Company's credit facilities, including certain risks and uncertainties related thereto.
(2)
The carrying value of the Company's standby letters of credit approximates the fair value as they represent the Company’s contingent obligation to perform in accordance with the underlying contracts. There were no amounts outstanding under these


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letters of credit as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016. The fair value of this contingent obligation is categorized within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.
(3)
The carrying value of the money market funds approximates fair value as the funds are highly liquid and short-term in nature. The funds seek to maintain a stable net asset value of $1.00 per share, and the market value per share of these funds are available in active markets. As such, they are categorized within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy. The money market funds accrue dividends, which are reinvested and reflected in the carrying value as of December 31, 2016. There were no money market funds outstanding as of June 30, 2017.
Nonrecurring Fair Value Measurements
The Company measures certain assets at fair value on a nonrecurring basis at least annually or when certain indicators are present. These assets include long-lived assets, goodwill and non-amortizing intangible assets that are written down to fair value when they are held for sale or determined to be impaired. During each of the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, there were no impairment indicators related to the Company's assets that are measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis.
Note 14. Derivatives and Hedging
In the normal course of business, the Company is exposed to gains and losses resulting from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates relating to transactions of its international subsidiaries. As part of its strategy to manage the level of exposure to the risk of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, the Company uses designated cash flow hedges and non-designated hedges in the form of foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate the impact of foreign currency translation on transactions that are denominated primarily in Japanese Yen, British Pounds, Euros, Canadian Dollars, Australian Dollars and Korean Won.
The Company accounts for its foreign currency forward contracts in accordance with ASC Topic 815, "Derivatives and Hedging ("ASC Topic 815"). ASC Topic 815 requires the recognition of all derivative instruments as either assets or liabilities on the balance sheet, the measurement of those instruments at fair value and the recognition of changes in the fair value of derivatives in earnings in the period of change, unless the derivative qualifies as a designated cash flow hedge that offsets certain exposures. Certain criteria must be satisfied in order for derivative financial instruments to be classified and accounted for as a cash flow hedge. Gains and losses from the remeasurement of qualifying cash flow hedges are recorded as a component of other comprehensive income and released into earnings as a component of cost of goods sold or net sales during the period in which the hedged transaction takes place. Gains and losses on the ineffective portion of hedges (hedges that do not meet accounting requirements due to ineffectiveness) and derivatives that are not elected for hedge accounting treatment are immediately recorded in earnings as a component of other income (expense).
Foreign currency forward contracts are used only to meet the Company’s objectives of minimizing variability in the Company’s operating results arising from foreign exchange rate movements. The Company does not enter into foreign currency forward contracts for speculative purposes. The Company utilizes counterparties for its derivative instruments that it believes are credit-worthy at the time the transactions are entered into and the Company closely monitors the credit ratings of these counterparties.
The following table summarizes the fair value of the Company's foreign currency forward contracts as well as the location of the asset and/or liability on the consolidated condensed balance sheets at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 (in thousands):
 
Asset Derivatives
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
 
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedging instruments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency forward contracts
Other current assets
 
$
39

 
Other current assets
 
$
2,660

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency forward contracts
Other current assets
 
$
289

 
Other current assets
 
$
864



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Liability Derivatives
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
 
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedging instruments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency forward contracts
Accounts payable and
accrued expenses
 
$
1,004

 
Accounts payable and
accrued expenses
 
$
28

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency forward contracts
Accounts payable and
accrued expenses
 
$
2,450

 
Accounts payable and
accrued expenses
 
$
57

The Company's foreign currency forward contracts are subject to a master netting agreement with each respective counterparty bank and are therefore net settled at their maturity date. Although the Company has the legal right of offset under the master netting agreements, the Company has elected not to present these contracts on a net settlement amount basis, and therefore present these contracts on a gross basis on the accompanying consolidated condensed balance sheets at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016.
Cash Flow Hedging Instruments
Beginning in January 2015, the Company entered into foreign currency forward contracts designated as qualifying cash flow hedging instruments to help mitigate the Company's foreign currency exposure on intercompany sales of inventory to its foreign subsidiaries. These contracts generally mature within 12 to 15 months from their inception. At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the notional amounts of the Company's foreign currency forward contracts designated as cash flow hedge instruments were approximately $24,847,000 and $27,325,000, respectively. The reporting of gains and losses on these cash flow hedging instruments depends on whether the gains or losses are effective at offsetting changes in the cash flows of the underlying hedged items. The Company uses the critical terms method to measure the effectiveness of the foreign currency forward contracts and evaluates the effectiveness on a quarterly basis. The effective portion of the gains and losses on the hedging instruments are recorded in other comprehensive income until recognized in earnings during the period that the hedged transactions take place. Any ineffective portion of the gains and losses from the hedging instruments is recognized in earnings immediately. The Company would discontinue hedge accounting prospectively (i) if it is determined that the derivative is no longer effective in offsetting changes in the cash flows of a hedged item, (ii) when the derivative expires or is sold, terminated, or exercised, (iii) if it becomes probable that the forecasted transaction being hedged by the derivative will not occur, (iv) if a hedged firm commitment no longer meets the definition of a firm commitment, or (v) if it is determined that designation of the derivative as a hedge instrument is no longer appropriate. The Company estimates the fair value of its foreign currency forward contracts based on pricing models using current market rates. These contracts are classified under Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy (see Note 13).
As of June 30, 2017, the Company recorded a net loss of $2,302,000 in other comprehensive income (loss) related to its hedging activities. Of this amount, net gains of $414,000 and $1,316,000 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, were relieved from other comprehensive income and recognized in cost of goods sold for the underlying intercompany sales that were recognized. There were no ineffective hedge gains or losses recognized during the three months ended June 30, 2017. Gains on forward points of $92,000 and $247,000 were expensed as incurred for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively. Based on the current valuation, the Company expects to reclassify net losses of $1,170,000 from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) into net earnings during the next 12 months.
The Company recognized net gains of $272,000 and $571,000 in cost of goods sold and net sales, respectively, for the six months ended June 30, 2016.
The following tables summarize the net effect of all cash flow hedges on the consolidated condensed financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2017 (in thousands):
 
 
Gain (Loss) Recognized in Other Comprehensive Income
(Effective Portion)
 
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedging instruments
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Foreign currency forward contracts
 
$
(48
)
 
$
57

 
$
(2,302
)
 
$
(1,614
)


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Gain (Loss) Reclassified from Other Comprehensive Income into Earnings
(Effective Portion)
 
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedging instruments
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Foreign currency forward contracts
 
$
414

 
$
(629
)
 
$
1,316

 
$
(843
)
 
 
 
 
 
The following table details the amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss to cost of goods sold, as well as changes in foreign currency translation for the three months ended June 30, 2017. Amounts are in thousands.
Accumulated other comprehensive loss, December 31, 2016
 
$
(18,466
)
Change in fair value of derivative instruments
 
(2,302
)
Net gains reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income to cost of goods sold
 
(1,316
)
Foreign currency translation adjustments
 
8,571

Accumulated other comprehensive loss, June 30, 2017, before tax
 
(13,513
)
Income tax expense related to derivative instruments
 
798

Less: Comprehensive income attributable to non-controlling interest
 
(190
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss, June 30, 2017, after tax and non-controlling interest
 
$
(12,905
)
Foreign Currency Forward Contracts Not Designated as Hedging Instruments
The Company uses foreign currency forward contracts that are not designated as qualifying cash flow hedging instruments to mitigate certain balance sheet exposures (payables and receivables denominated in foreign currencies), as well as gains and losses resulting from the translation of the operating results of the Company’s international subsidiaries into U.S. dollars for financial reporting purposes. These contracts generally mature within 12 months from their inception. At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the notional amounts of the Company’s foreign currency forward contracts used to mitigate the exposures discussed above were approximately $74,535,000 and $14,821,000, respectively. The increase in foreign currency forward contracts reflects the general timing of when the Company enters into these contracts. The Company estimates the fair values of foreign currency forward contracts based on pricing models using current market rates, and records all derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value with changes in fair value recorded in the statement of operations. The foreign currency contracts are classified under Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy (see Note 13).
The following table summarizes the location of net gains and losses in the consolidated condensed statements of operations that were recognized during the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively (in thousands):
  
 
Location of Net Loss Recognized in Income on Derivative Instruments
 
Amount of Net Loss Recognized in Income on 
Derivative Instruments
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Foreign currency forward contracts
 
Other income (expense), net
 
$
(1,128
)
 
$
(3,546
)
 
$
(6,303
)
 
$
(9,858
)
In addition, for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized net foreign currency gains related to transactions with its foreign subsidiaries of $24,000 and $1,353,000, respectively. In addition, for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized net foreign currency gains related to transactions with its foreign subsidiaries of $699,000 and $2,665,000, respectively.
Note 15. Segment Information
As a result of the Company's recently completed apparel joint venture in Japan in July 2016, as well as the Company's recent acquisition of OGIO in January 2017, the Company reassessed its operating segments during the first quarter of 2017 consistent with the way management reviews it's business operations on an ongoing basis. With the addition of the apparel joint venture and OGIO acquisition, the Company anticipates generating significant growth within its accessories and other product category that


25

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was previously included within the Company's golf clubs segment. As a result, and based on the Company's assessment, starting as of January 1, 2017, sales generated from golf apparel and footwear, golf bags, golf gloves, travel gear, headwear and other golf-related accessories, OGIO branded gear and accessories, retail apparel sales from the Company's joint venture in Japan, in addition to royalties from licensing of the Company’s trademarks and service marks for various soft goods will be included in the gear, accessories and other operating segment. The golf clubs segment will now consist of Callaway Golf woods, hybrids, irons and wedges, Odyssey putters, including Toulon Design putters by Odyssey, packaged sets and sales of pre-owned golf clubs. The golf balls segment consists of Callaway Golf and Strata balls that are designed, manufactured and sold by the Company. The Company's operating segments are organized on the basis of products. There are no significant intersegment transactions.
The table below contains information utilized by management to evaluate its operating segments for the interim periods presented (in thousands). Prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform with the current period presentation.
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Six Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
2017
 
2016(1)
 
2017
 
2016(1)
Net sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Golf Clubs
$
196,291

 
$
164,451

 
$
389,882

 
$
359,512

Golf Balls
48,767

 
46,996

 
96,991

 
88,412

Gear, Accessories and Other
59,490

 
34,147

 
126,602

 
71,723

 
$
304,548

 
$
245,594

 
$
613,475

 
$
519,647

Income before income taxes:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Golf Clubs
$
38,445

 
$
17,973

 
$
73,398

 
$
53,414

Golf Balls
10,939

 
7,534

 
22,460

 
18,140

Gear, Accessories and Other
11,877

 
6,696

 
21,496

 
16,158

Reconciling items(2)
(13,737
)
 
3,839

 
(30,744
)
 
(11,879
)
 
$
47,524

 
$
36,042

 
$
86,610

 
$
75,833

Additions to long-lived assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Golf Clubs
$
2,817

 
$
1,260

 
$
6,612

 
$
3,969

Golf Balls
2,553

 
629

 
5,088

 
1,572

Gear, Accessories and Other
1,024

 
316

 
1,526

 
497

 
$
6,394

 
$
2,205

 
$
13,226

 
$
6,038

 
(1)
Prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation as the result of the change in operating segments as of January 1, 2017.
(2)
Reconciling items represent corporate general and administrative expenses and other income (expense) not included by management in determining segment profitability. The change in reconciling items for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 compared to the same periods in 2016 was primarily due to a $17,662,000 gain recognized in the second quarter of 2016 in connection with the sale of approximately 10% of the Company's investment in Topgolf. For further information see Note 8 "Investments."


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June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016(1)
Total Assets:(2)
 
 
 
Golf Clubs
$
257,247

 
$
277,469

Golf Balls
43,265

 
42,460

Gear, Accessories and Other
103,790

 
38,270

Reconciling items
450,862

 
443,083

 
$
855,164

 
$
801,282

Goodwill:
 
 
 
Golf Clubs
$
26,365

 
$
25,593

Golf Balls

 

Gear, Accessories and Other
5,543

 

 
$
31,908

 
$
25,593

 
(1)
Prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation as the result of the change in operating segments as of January 1, 2017.
(2)
Total assets by reportable segment are comprised of net inventory, certain property, plant and equipment, intangible assets and goodwill. Reconciling items represent unallocated corporate assets not segregated between the three segments including cash and cash equivalents, net accounts receivable, and deferred tax assets.
Note 16. Subsequent Event
Acquisition of TravisMathew, LLC
On August 3, 2017, the Company announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire TravisMathew, LLC, a high-growth golf and lifestyle apparel company, for $125,500,000 in an all-cash transaction, subject to customary working capital adjustments. The Company believes this acquisition will align with the Company's business, growth strategy, brands and culture, and will allow the Company to further diversify its business into areas tangential to golf. The acquisition is subject to customary closing conditions, including security regulatory approvals, and is expected to close in the third quarter of 2017.


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Item 2.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this report. See also “Important Notice to Investors Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” on page 2 of this report.
Discussion of Non-GAAP Measures
In addition to the financial results contained in this report, which have been prepared and presented in accordance with GAAP, the Company has also included supplemental information concerning the Company’s financial results on a non-GAAP basis. This non-GAAP information includes certain of the Company's financial results without transaction costs and transition costs associated with the OGIO acquisition for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, and the gain on the sale of a portion of the Company's Topgolf investment for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016. In addition, because the Company had a valuation allowance on its U.S. deferred tax assets in the first half of 2016, income tax expense related to its U.S. business for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, was minimal. During the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company reversed a significant portion of the valuation allowance and recognized income taxes that were retroactive for all of 2016. Therefore, for comparability to 2017, the Company applied a 38.5% estimated statutory tax rate to calculate non-GAAP results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016.
The Company has included in this report information to reconcile this non-GAAP information to the most directly comparable GAAP information. The non-GAAP information presented in this report should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for any measure derived in accordance with GAAP. The non-GAAP information may also be inconsistent with the manner in which similar measures are derived or used by other companies. Management uses such non-GAAP information for financial and operational decision-making purposes and as a means to evaluate period over period comparisons of the underlying performance of its business and in forecasting the Company’s business going forward. Management believes that the presentation of such non-GAAP information, when considered in conjunction with the most directly comparable GAAP information, provides additional useful comparative information for investors in their assessment of the underlying performance of the Company’s business.
Results of Operations
Overview of Business and Seasonality
Products
The Company designs, manufactures and sells high quality golf clubs, golf balls, golf bags and other golf-related accessories. The Company designs its products to be technologically advanced and in this regard invests a considerable amount in research and development each year. The Company designs golf products for golfers of all skill levels, both amateur and professional. In January 2017, the Company completed the acquisition of OGIO International, Inc. ("OGIO"), a leading manufacturer of high quality bags, accessories and apparel in the golf and lifestyle categories. The primary reason for the acquisition was to enhance the Company's presence in golf while also providing a platform for future growth in the lifestyle category.
Operating Segments
As a result of the Company's recently completed apparel joint venture in Japan in July 2016, as well as the Company's recent acquisition of OGIO in January 2017, the Company reassessed its operating segments during the first quarter of 2017. With the addition of the apparel joint venture and OGIO acquisition, the Company anticipates generating significant growth within its accessories and other product category that was previously included within the Company's golf clubs segment. As a result, and based on the Company's assessment, starting as of January 1, 2017, revenues generated from golf apparel and footwear, golf bags, golf gloves, travel gear, headwear and other golf-related accessories, OGIO branded gear and accessories, retail apparel sales from the Company's joint venture in Japan, and royalties from licensing of the Company’s trademarks and service marks for various soft goods products will be included in the gear, accessories and other operating segment. Accordingly, the prior year amounts have been reclassified to reflect this change. The golf clubs segment now consists of Callaway Golf woods, hybrids, irons and wedges, Odyssey putters, including Toulon Design putters by Odyssey, packaged sets and sales of pre-owned golf clubs. The golf balls segment consists of Callaway Golf and Strata balls that are designed, manufactured and sold by the Company. The Company’s operating segments exclude a significant amount of corporate general administrative expenses and other income (expense) not utilized by management in determining segment profitability. For further information about the Company's segments see Note 15 “Segment Information” to the Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q.


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Cost of Sales
The Company’s cost of sales is comprised primarily of material and component costs, distribution and warehousing costs, and overhead. As a result of the actions taken to improve manufacturing efficiencies, over 85% of the Company's manufacturing costs, primarily material and component costs, are variable in nature and fluctuate with sales volumes. With respect to the Company's operating segments, variable costs as a percentage of cost of sales range between 85% to 95% for golf clubs and 75% to 85% for golf balls. Variable costs for gear, accessories and other are generally greater than 95% as fewer fixed costs are used in the manufacturing of the Company's soft goods products. Generally, the relative significance of the components of cost of sales does not vary materially from these percentages from period to period. See "Operating Segments Results for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016—Segment Profitability" below for further discussion of gross margins.
Seasonality
Golf Club and Golf Balls
In most of the regions where the Company does business, the game of golf is played primarily on a seasonal basis. Weather conditions generally restrict golf from being played year-round, except in a few markets, with many of the Company’s on-course customers closing for the cold weather months. The Company’s golf clubs and golf balls businesses are therefore subject to seasonal fluctuations. In general, during the first quarter, the Company begins selling its golf clubs and golf balls products into the golf retail channel for the new golf season. This initial sell-in generally continues into the second quarter. The Company’s second-quarter sales are significantly affected by the amount of reorder business of the products sold during the first quarter. The Company’s third-quarter sales are generally dependent on reorder business but can also include smaller new product launches, typically resulting in lower sales than the second quarter as many retailers begin decreasing their inventory levels in anticipation of the end of the golf season. The Company’s fourth-quarter sales are generally less than the other quarters due to the end of the golf season in many of the Company’s key regions. However, fourth-quarter sales can be affected from time to time by the early launch of product introductions related to the new golf season of the subsequent year. This seasonality, and therefore quarter-to-quarter fluctuations, can be affected by many factors, including the timing of new product introductions as well as weather conditions. In general, because of this seasonality, a majority of the Company’s sales from its golf clubs and golf balls operating segments and most, if not all, of its profitability from these segments occurs during the first half of the year.
Gear, Accessories and Other
Sales of the Company's gear and accessories historically followed the golf clubs and golf balls seasonality, where most of the sales and profitability occurred during the first half of the year. With the Company's addition of the Japan apparel joint venture in July 2016 and the recent acquisition of OGIO in January 2017, the Company is anticipating higher profitability during the second half of the year as these business generate higher sales in the third and fourth quarters during the winter apparel season in Japan, and during the holiday season in the U.S. when sales of OGIO branded products are expected to increase.
Foreign Currency
A significant portion of the Company’s business is conducted outside of the United States in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. As a result, changes in foreign currency rates can have a significant effect on the Company’s financial results. The Company enters into foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate the effects of changes in foreign currency rates. While these foreign currency forward contracts can mitigate the effects of changes in foreign currency rates, they do not eliminate those effects, which can be significant. These effects include (i) the translation of results denominated in foreign currency into U.S. dollars for reporting purposes, (ii) the mark-to-market adjustments of certain intercompany balance sheet accounts denominated in foreign currencies and (iii) the mark-to-market adjustments of the Company’s foreign currency forward contracts. In general, the Company’s overall financial results are affected positively by a weaker U.S. dollar and are affected negatively by a stronger U.S. dollar as compared to the foreign currencies in which the Company conducts its business.
Executive Summary
In comparing the Company’s results for the second quarter and first half of 2017 to the same periods in the prior year, the following factors affect the year-over-year comparisons:
The Company’s results for the second quarter and first six months of 2017 include transaction and transition expenses related to the OGIO acquisition in the amounts of $2.3 million and $6.2 million, respectively.
The Company’s results for the second quarter and first six months of 2016 include a pre-tax gain of $17.7 million from the sale of approximately 10% of the Company's investment in Topgolf. There was no such sale or gain in 2017.


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The Company’s apparel joint venture in Japan did not commence until July 1, 2016 and the Ogio acquisition was not completed until January 2017. Results from those two entities were included in the second quarter and first half of 2017 but not in the comparable periods in 2016.
During the second quarter and first half of 2016, the Company did not recognize income tax expense on its U.S. operations due to the prior valuation allowance on its U.S. deferred tax assets. Most of the valuation allowance was reversed in the fourth quarter of 2016 and therefore in January 2017 the Company once again began recognizing income tax expense on its U.S. operations. When evaluating the Company’s performance on a non-GAAP basis, the Company applies an estimated tax rate of 38.5% to its 2016 results to make it more comparable to 2017.
Beginning in January 2017, the Company began reporting three operating segments (namely, Golf Clubs, Golf Balls and Gear, Accessories and Other) as opposed to the two operating segments reported in 2016 (namely, Golf Clubs and Golf Balls). For comparison purposes, the 2016 results have been reclassified to reflect the current year operating segment presentation.
The Company’s results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 reflect its continued brand momentum and increased hard goods market share, as well as increased sales in all operating segments and in all reporting geographic regions. Net sales for the second quarter of 2017 increased by $59.0 million or 24.0% to $304.5 million, compared to the second quarter of 2016, and net sales for the first six months of 2017 increased by $93.9 million or 18.1% to $613.5 million compared to the first six months of 2016. These increases are attributable to the strength of the Company’s 2017 product line, including continued success of the current year EPIC line of products, increased golf ball sales, including the new Chrome Soft X ball, and increased sales of gear and accessories as a result of the Ogio acquisition and the new apparel joint venture in Japan.
The Company’s gross margin improved 370 basis points to 48.7% in the second quarter of 2017, and 140 basis points to 48.2% in the first six months of 2017, both compared to the same periods in 2016. This improvement was primarily due to a favorable shift in product mix toward the higher margin EPIC woods combined with higher prices, less discounting and lower promotional activity. These increases were partially offset by the newly acquired businesses mentioned above, which have lower gross margins relative to the Company’s golf equipment business.
Operating expenses increased $9.4 million or 10.4% to $99.1 million in the second quarter of 2017 compared to the second quarter of 2016 almost entirely due to the Company’s newly acquired businesses, combined with $2.3 million of transaction and transition charges related to the OGIO acquisition. Operating expenses increased $25.8 million or 14.6% in the first six months of 2017, compared to the first six months in 2016, largely due to the Company’s newly acquired businesses, combined with $6.2 million of transaction and transition charges related to the OGIO acquisition.
The provision for income taxes increased by $14.2 million to $16.1 million in the second quarter of 2017, compared to the second quarter of 2016, and increased by $25.9 million to $29.3 million in the first six months of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. These increases reflect the recognition of U.S income tax expense on the Company’s U.S. operations in 2017 but not in 2016 as discussed above.
Net income decreased $2.7 million or 7.8% to $31.4 million in the second quarter of 2017 compared to the second quarter of 2016, and diluted earnings per share decreased by $0.03 or 8.3% to $0.33. Net income decreased $15.4 million or 21.2% to $57.1 million in the first six months of 2017 compared to the first six months of 2016, and diluted earnings per share decreased by $0.17 or 22.4% to $0.59. On a non-GAAP basis, excluding the acquisition costs in the second quarter and first six months of 2017 and the Topgolf gain in both the second quarter and first six months of 2016, and applying a 38.5% estimated statutory tax rate to the non-GAAP results for the second quarter and first six months of 2016, the Company's net income and diluted earnings per share for the second quarter of 2017 would have increased by $21.6 million or 191% to $32.9 million and by $0.22 or 183% to $0.34 compared to the second quarter of 2016, and by $25.4 million or 71% to $61.2 million and by $0.27 or 73% to $0.64 for the first six months of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016.
Three-Month Periods Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016
Net sales for the second quarter of 2017 increased by $59.0 million (24.0%) to $304.6 million compared to $245.6 million in the second quarter of 2016. This improvement was driven by an increase in net sales in all three of the Company's operating segments. The largest increase was in the golf clubs operating segment primarily due to the continued success of the current year Epic line of drivers and fairway woods. In addition, the gear, accessories and other operating segment increased primarily as a result of incremental sales of bags and gear due to the Company's acquisition of OGIO in January 2017, as well as incremental sales of apparel in Japan due to the Company's apparel joint venture (which was established during the third quarter of 2016). The


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increase in the golf balls operating segment was largely due to sales of the new Supersoft and Chrome Soft X golf balls launched in the current year. Net sales increased in all regions as noted below.
The Company’s net sales by operating segment are presented below (dollars in millions):
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Growth
 
2017
 
2016(1)
 
Dollars
 
Percent
Net sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Golf clubs
$
196.3

 
$
164.5

 
$
31.8

 
19.3
%
Golf balls
48.8

 
47.0

 
1.8

 
3.8
%
Gear, accessories and other
59.5

 
34.1

 
25.4

 
74.5
%
 
$
304.6

 
$
245.6

 
$
59.0

 
24.0
%
 
(1)
Prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation as the result of the change in operating segments as of January 1, 2017.
For further discussion of each operating segment’s results, see "Operating Segments Results for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016" below.
Net sales information by region is summarized as follows (dollars in millions):
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Growth
 
2017
 
2016
 
Dollars
 
Percent
Net sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
United States
$
168.4

 
$
127.2

 
$
41.2

 
32.4
%
Europe
43.0

 
36.9

 
6.1

 
16.5
%
Japan
47.9

 
40.6

 
7.3

 
18.0
%
Rest of Asia
24.3

 
20.1

 
4.2

 
20.9
%
Other countries
21.0

 
20.8

 
0.2

 
1.0
%
 
$
304.6

 
$
245.6

 
$
59.0

 
24.0
%
Net sales in the United States increased $41.2 million (32.4%) to $168.4 million during the second quarter of 2017 compared to $127.2 million in the second quarter of 2016. This increase was primarily due to the success of the Company's new Epic line of drivers and fairway woods launched during the first quarter of 2017, combined with incremental sales of bags and gear due to the Company's acquisition of OGIO in January 2017. The Company’s sales in regions outside of the United States increased $17.8 million (15.0%) to $136.2 million for the second quarter of 2017 compared to $118.4 million in the second quarter of 2016. The increase in sales in foreign regions was primarily due to a $7.3 million increase in Japan, primarily due to an increase in apparel sales resulting from the Company's apparel joint venture, combined with a decrease in promotional activity period over period. Additionally, sales in Europe increased $6.1 million (16.5%) to $43.0 million during the second quarter of 2017 compared to $36.9 million in the second quarter of 2016, primarily due to increased sales of drivers and fairway woods due to the success of the Company's new Epic woods products, as noted above. Net sales in foreign regions were negatively impacted by $4.1 million in foreign currency exchange due to fluctuations in foreign currency rates relative to the same period in the prior year.
Gross profit increased $37.6 million (34.0%) to $148.2 million in the second quarter of 2017 compared to $110.6 million in the second quarter of 2016. Gross profit as a percentage of net sales (“gross margin”) increased to 48.7% in the second quarter of 2017 compared to 45.0% in the second quarter of 2016. The increase in gross margin was primarily due to (i) an increase of approximately 510 basis points due to a favorable shift in price and product mix within the woods and irons categories combined with a general increase in average selling prices across most product categories. The shift in price and product mix was primarily driven by the current year launch of the Epic line of drivers, which have higher margins compared to the XR 16 line of drivers, in addition to a decrease in promotional activity primarily within the irons product category period over period; and (ii) an increase of approximately 130 basis points primarily due to foreign currency translation on inventory held in foreign locations. These increases were partially offset by a decline of approximately 250 basis points primarily due to (i) higher freight costs resulting


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from more air shipments to meet the high demand of the Company's current year products and (ii) an increase in club component costs due to the higher cost materials and technology incorporated into current year products, in addition to a decline of approximately 60 basis points due to the newly acquired businesses, which have lower gross margins relative to the Company's core business. For further discussion of gross margin, see "Results of Operations—Overview of Business and Seasonality—Cost of Sales" above and "Operating Segments Results for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016—Segment Profitability" below.
Selling expenses increased by $3.7 million to $68.1 million (22.4% of net sales) in the second quarter of 2017 compared to $64.4 million (26.2% of net sales) in the second quarter of 2016. This increase was primarily due to an additional $4.9 million of selling costs resulting from both the formation and consolidation of the Company's apparel joint venture in Japan established during the third quarter of 2016, and the acquisition of OGIO in January 2017, as well as an increase of $1.2 million in employee costs. These increases were partially offset by decreases of $1.9 million in marketing and tour expenses, and $0.4 million in bad debt expense.
General and administrative expenses increased by $5.1 million to $22.2 million (7.3% of net sales) in the second quarter of 2017 compared to $17.1 million (7.0% of net sales) in the second quarter of 2016. This increase was primarily due to an additional $4.5 million of general and administrative costs resulting from both the formation and consolidation of the Company's apparel joint venture in Japan established during the third quarter of 2016, and the acquisition of OGIO in January 2017, combined with increases of $0.4 million in accrued employee incentive compensation expense, and $0.3 million in legal expenses.
Research and development expenses increased by $0.6 million to $8.9 million (2.9% of net sales) in the second quarter of 2017 compared to $8.3 million (3.4% of net sales) in the second quarter of 2016, primarily due to an increase in employee costs.
Net interest expense increased slightly to $0.9 million in the second quarter of 2017 compared to $0.7 million in the second quarter of 2016.
During the second quarter of 2016, the Company recognized a $17.7 million pre-tax gain on the sale of golf-related ventures as a result of the sale of approximately 10.0% of its investment in Topgolf for $23.4 million. See Note 8 “Investments” to the Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements included in Part I, Item 1, of this Form 10-Q.
Other income/expense, net decreased to other expense of $0.9 million in the second quarter of 2017 compared to other expense of $2.1 million in the second quarter of 2016, primarily due to a decrease in net foreign currency losses period over period.
The Company’s provision for income taxes increased by $14.2 million to $16.1 million in the second quarter of 2017, compared to $1.9 million in the second quarter of 2016, primarily due to the recognition of income tax expense on the Company's U.S. operations in the second quarter of 2017. The Company's full valuation allowance that was established in June 2011 against the Company's U.S. deferred tax assets resulted in minimal U.S. tax expense in the second quarter of 2016. During the fourth quarter of 2016, the Company reversed a significant portion of the valuation allowance against those deferred tax assets. As a result of the reversal, the Company began recognizing income taxes again on its U.S. operations as of January 1, 2017. For further discussion see Note 10 “Income Taxes” to the Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-Q.
Net income for the second quarter of 2017 decreased $2.7 million to $31.4 million compared to $34.1 million in the second quarter of 2016. Diluted earnings per share decreased to $0.33 in the second quarter of 2017 compared to $0.36 in the second quarter of 2016. As previously discussed in the Executive Summary, on a non-GAAP basis, excluding after-tax acquisition costs of $1.5 million in the second quarter of 2017 and the Topgolf gain of $17.7 million in the second quarter of 2016, and applying a 38.5% estimated statutory tax rate to the non-GAAP results for the second quarter of 2016, the Company's net income and diluted earnings per share for the second quarter of 2017 would have increased by $21.6 million or 191% to $32.9 million and by $0.22 or 183% to $0.34 compared to the second quarter of 2016.


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The table below presents a reconciliation of the Company's results under GAAP for the second quarter of 2017 and 2016, to the Company's non-GAAP results as defined above for the same periods (in millions).
 
Three months ended June 30, 2017
 
Three months ended June 30, 2016
 
As Reported
 
Ogio Acquisition Costs(1)
 
Non-GAAP
 
As Reported
 
Non-Cash Tax Adjustment(2)
 
Topgolf Gain(3)
 
Non-GAAP
Net income (loss) attributable to Callaway Golf Company
$
31.4

 
$
(1.5
)
 
$
32.9

 
$
34.1

 
$
5.1

 
$
17.7

 
$
11.3

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted earnings (loss) per share
$
0.33

 
$
(0.01
)
 
$
0.34

 
$
0.36

 
$
0.05

 
$
0.19

 
$
0.12

Weighted-average shares outstanding
96.2

 
96.2

 
96.2

 
95.9

 
95.9

 
95.9

 
95.9

 
(1)
Represents transaction and transition costs associated with the acquisition of Ogio International, Inc in January 2017. The income tax benefit of $0.8 million associated with these costs were based on the Company's effective tax rate for the three months ended June 30, 2017.
(2)
Impact of applying an estimated statutory tax rate of 38.5% to pre-tax income of $18.4 million on a non-GAAP basis for the second quarter of 2016.
(3)
Gain recognized on the sale of approximately 10% of the Company's investment in Topgolf.
Operating Segments Results for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016
Golf Clubs
Golf club sales increased $31.8 million (19.3%) to $196.3 million in the second quarter of 2017 compared to $164.5 million in the second quarter of 2016. This increase was primarily due the success of the current year Epic line of drivers and fairway woods, partially offset by decline in sales of irons and putters compared to the prior year due to a shift in product launch timing. Net sales by product category is summarized as follows (dollars in millions):
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Growth/(Decline)
 
2017
 
2016(1)
 
Dollars
 
Percent

Net sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Woods
$
89.3

 
$
54.6

 
$
34.7

 
63.6
 %
Irons
82.3

 
84.5

 
(2.2
)
 
(2.6
)%
Putters
24.7

 
25.4

 
(0.7
)
 
(2.8
)%
 
$
196.3

 
$
164.5

 
$
31.8

 
19.3
 %
 
(1)
Prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation as the result of the change in operating segments as of January 1, 2017.
The $34.7 million (63.6%increase in net sales of woods to $89.3 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2017, compared to $54.6 million in the comparable period in 2016, was primarily due to a 33.4% increase in average selling prices and a 22.6% increase in sales volume. These increases resulted primarily from a favorable shift in product mix due to the success of the Company's more premium Epic family of drivers and fairway woods launched in 2017 compared to sales of the Company's more moderately priced XR 16 woods products launched in 2016.
Net sales of irons decreased $2.2 million (2.6%) to $82.3 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2017 compared to $84.5 million in the comparable period in 2016 primarily due to a 8.0% decline in sales volume partially offset by a 6.5% increase in average selling prices. The decrease in sales volumes was primarily due to a shift in launch timing resulting in fewer new irons products during the second quarter of 2017, compared to the same period in the prior year. The increase in average selling prices was primarily due to the Epic line of irons launched in the current year, which have a higher average selling price compared to the Big Bertha Beta irons launched in the prior year, combined with a decrease in promotional activity period over period.
Net sales of putters decreased $0.7 million (2.8%) to $24.7 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2017 compared to $25.4 million in the comparable period in 2016 primarily due to an 11.5% decrease in sales volume partially offset by a 9.9% increase


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in average selling prices. The decline in sales volume was primarily due to a decline in sales of the Company's premium putters, which are in the second year of their product life-cycle. The increase in average selling prices was driven by the current year launch of the Odyssey Works line of putters, which were launched at a higher price compared to the prior year models, combined with a decrease in promotional activity period over period.
Golf Balls
Net sales information for the golf balls segment is summarized as follows (dollars in millions):
 
Three Months Ended 
 June 30,
 
Growth
 
2017
 
2016
 
Dollars
 
Percent
Net sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Golf balls
$
48.8

 
$
47.0

 
$
1.8

 
3.8
%
Net sales of golf balls increased $1.8 million (3.8%) to $48.8 million for the quarter ended